The Ultimate Gut-Healthy Breakfast

This is my go-to breakfast on the farm, and it ticks all my boxes – fast, tasty, low-GI, gluten-free, probiotic, satisfying, resistant starch, boosts your nervous system, and superfood-charged. What’s not to like?

Ingredients

170 ml Chuckling Goat Kefir (per person)
1 handful of organic jumbo oats (per person)
50 g fruit of choice (per person)
1 TBSP chia seeds
100% pure stevia to taste.

Optional add ons: pinch of sea salt, ½ tsp natural vanilla extract

Method

The night before, soak the oatmeal and chia seeds in the kefir. When you’re ready to drink in the morning, add the fruit and other optional ingredients, and blend until smooth. Sweeten with 100% pure stevia to taste. Thin with water to desired consistency.

Notes

This is a real powerhouse, and works in a variety of ways. Soaking the oats in the kefir overnight means that you’re soaking a whole grain in an acid mixture. This helps break down phytic acid, an antinutrient that interferes with digestive enzymes and inhibits mineral absorption. Cooking is one way to break down phytic acids, but research suggests that soaking with something acidic may be even better at easing digestibility.

You may have read about the benefits of chia. Chia seeds are great, but they need to be soaked before consuming, and this recipe provides a convenient and easy way to do that. Chia have a mucilaginous shell coating, and will absorb up to 12 times their weight in water – and you don’t want them doing that inside your throat! They need to be expanded before you consume, not after. Also, as with all seeds, they have phytic acids in them to prevent the birds eating them. Soaking chia will activate the seed making it more bio-available to your body, helping to prevent blood sugar spikes, decreasing cholesterol and keeping you hydrated longer. Also, hydrated chia slows digestion; it takes longer for your stomach to empty, so you feel full for longer.

So, you’re soaking the oatmeal and the chia in the kefir overnight. You’re waiting until morning to add the fruit, however, as the fructose in the fruit will degrade the probiotics if it sits with them overnight. This is why you never want to buy flavoured kefir – anything that flavours it will kill the good bugs as it sits on the shelf! Keep your kefir pure, and only blend it right before you’re ready to drink it.

Why raw oats, and not cooked? Raw oats are one of the best sources going of resistant starch. Resistant starch is what’s left over when your body has digested everything – and what’s left is what the gut bugs eat! This is one of the reasons why diets that are highly processed are so bad for you – your body burns right through that light-weight stuff like putting tissue paper in a fireplace, and there’s nothing left for your friendly gut bugs to eat. Gut bugs eat resistant starch and happily produce butyrate, which is the holy grail of the immune system. So gut bugs love raw soaked oatmeal!

Oats are one of the best remedies for for stress. In the medical herbal traditional, oats are considered specific for helping with nervous disability and exhaustion, especially when associated with depression. Oats are used as a nerve tonic, both relaxant and stimulatory, to strengthen the entire nervous system. And oats are naturally gluten-free! If you’re actually coeliac, it’s worth paying extra for gluten-free oats; this just means that the oats have been grown in an exclusion zone, where birds can’t drop in any outside grains that might contain gluten. Otherwise, just go for plain old jumbo unprocessed oats – you’ll be fine.

As a side-benefit, oatmeal boosts weight loss. It digests slowly in your system, triggering the release of digestive acids shown to suppress the appetite and speed up calorie burning. Swapping just 5 percent of daily carbohydrates for resistant starch could boost the metabolism by 23 percent.

Oat bran, which is in the whole oats, lowers cholesterol. Just 3 grams of oat fiber called beta-glucan has been shown to reduce cholesterol levels by 5 to 10 percent. You’ll need to eat two servings of regular oatmeal daily to reap the benefits. But just one bowl of overnight oats may be equally, if not more effective.

This meal also has a creamy, pudding-like consistency that makes it pleasant to eat – definitely has the yummm factor! That’s important because if you enjoy something, you’re likely to absorb more nutrients from it. Thai women fed a traditional Thai dish absorbed twice as much iron than a group of Swedish women fed the same meal, which they reported not enjoying. And when the two groups ate traditional Swedish fare, the Swedes absorbed 50 percent more iron than the Thai women who didn’t care for the meal, according to one study. The more enjoyable your oaty experience, the more zinc, copper, magnesium, biotin and B vitamins you’ll absorb.

So enjoy!

Here are some weekly variations, so you can mix it up and keep it fresh:

  1. Monday – Blueberry Surprise (50 g blueberries per person, 1 TBSP coconut oil)
  2. Tuesday -Bounty Bliss ( 1 TSP coconut oil, 2 TSP raw cacao powder per person )
  3. Wednesday – Peanut M&M (2 TBSP natural peanut butter, 2 TBSP raw cacao powder per person )
  4. Thursday – Carrot Cake (½ large carrot, peeled and chunked, ½ tsp cinnamon per person )
  5. Friday – Pina Colada – (1/2 banana, 1 TSP coconut oil, 50 g pineapple per person)
  6. Saturday – Strawberry Surprise (50 g fresh strawberries,½ tsp pure vanilla extract per person)
  7. Sunday – Exotic Holiday – 50 g mango, 50 g pineapple, 1 TBSP coconut oil per person)
Comment Count26

26 Comments

  1. Hi I am interested in your kefir but I am a bit concerned because I heard that there are side effects and should only be consumed if you already have a strong immune system. Also can I add honey instead of stevie. Thanks

  2. I always thought that you recommended drinking kefir on an empty stomach and not eating or drinking anything for 10 minutes to allow the good bacteria to get to work so I am confused that you are adding it to oats. This seems contradictory to how you recommend kefir is consumed so can you clarify please as the overnight oats sound delicious but I’m not sure how to take consume my kefir now. I love your kefir and wouldn’t start my day with anything else.

    1. Hi Susan – Kefir is fine to consume with overnight oats. The idea here is that you want the kefir to get a good clear run at your intestine – so you wouldn’t want to drink it after say, a greasy full breakfast that would fill your intestine and block the kefir from attaching to the inner surface of the intestine. Best, Shann

  3. This breakfast sounds great but I’m a bit confused as the kefir info says to wait 10 mins before having food( except fruit) and this has oats actually in it, so how can this be?

    1. Hi Suzanne – The idea here is that you want the kefir to have a nice clear run at sticking to the inside of your gut. Blending up with oats will not impede this process. You wouldn’t want to drink the kefir after, say, a greasy full breakfast that would coat the intestinal wall and prevent adherence. Best, Shann

  4. Hi Shann,
    I discovered this site today, and am very interested in the products, especially the Kefir, which I hope to purchase soon. I was diagnosed with Hypothyroidism in 2003 and Rosacea in 2006, I tried all sorts of things to get rid of the Rosacea, nothing really worked, the pills I got from the doctors did work for a while, and made me look really well, then I became allergic to them, the second pill he gave me seemed to work to some extent but it was the side effects that made me eventually stop having them. I then discovered coconut oil and until Oct 2017 my skin had been clear of Rosacea, then it started up again, I have put this down to not having coconut oil every day through the summer in porridge, I think I might have leaky gut syndrome, which I aim to heal by using Kefir and making these Ultimate breakfast meals, which will make a lovely change from porridge, I aim to overhaul my diet. I definitely think I need to take this step in healing my body. Thank you

    1. Hi Angie – If you’d like some personalised advice, please feel free to ring the office and book a consultation, you can tell them Shann said to waive the fee. 01239 654 072 – x

  5. Hi Shann,
    I have been taking this lovely kefir for over a year now. I use it in a smoothie for breakfast with chia seeds, a mix of banana, blueberries and spinach and add a scoop of soy based protein powder. I love this, however just wanted to check that this is ok to have every day like this. I have found that over the past year, dietary symptoms have improved and immunity is good. Just recently though, some digestive symptoms have flared, probably due to stress (and I have MS). Would you recommend a change of mixture or should I have neat for a while?
    Thank you!

    1. Hi Sally – I don’t recommend unfermented soy, as it is a thyroid inhibitor and full of lectins. Otherwise your smoothie combo sounds good – but I would recommend getting some variety in there, mix up the fruits daily and add different powers like spirulina, wheat grass, flaxseed oil, macha, Siberian gingeng, ashwagandha. Best, Shann

  6. Hi, This sounds a really healthy way to start the day. Unfortunately, I haven’t any kefir at the moment. Could I use coconut milk and/or goat’s yoghurt for the soaking until I get another supply of kefir?

    1. Hi Marion – I don’t recommend coconut milk because it’s not a natural product and it’s high in saturated fat – it’s the meat of the coconut suspended in fluid with the use of gums, etc. Coconut water and coconut meat are natural and healthful. You could use goat yogurt, but it doesn’t have the powerful probiotic punch that kefir does.

      1. Hi Shann
        Just read this info on coconut milk been using it for a while now obviously not a good plan so do I use coconut water instead please

        1. Hi Ruth – If you want to use milk, I’d advise goat, oat or almond. If you want to use a coconut product, stick with coconut meat, oil or water. Best, Shann

  7. Hi Shann, I am in the middle of reading The Kefir Solution and although I don’t have IBS, I thought kefir might just be the thing for helping me to rebalance my gut. The problem I have is that I have to “throw bleach into the river” everyday, as I am on lifetime prophylactic antibiotics after one of my “bugs” decided to go rogue after a number of surgeries (cancer, tkr, hematomae after a fall, etc.) I used to take probiotics and eat yogurt every evening to give my gut a chance to recover somewhat overnight, but then I have to take the antibiotics 3x daily starting with breakfast. Do you think the kefir will actually still help in my situation? Kind regards, Michelle G [PS: Have just made a one-off order, just in case! -M x]

  8. May sound like a daft question, but do you have to blend this? Or could you just add the fruit on top of the oats and eat it with a spoon, porridge-style? I’m not great with big glasses of liquidised food, in the morning especially 🙂

    Also I was interested to read in the previous comments how it’s OK to have kefir with other foods like oats and fruits – I also got the impression from your literature that it was best taken in isolation. So would it be alright to have a coffee or tea alongside this breakfast, then?

    Thanks for everything you’re doing – I’m only about three weeks into my kefir but already seeing some remarkable changes, can’t wait to see how it evolves from here … 🙂

    1. Hi Aimee- No, you don’t have to blend unless you want to. Kefir together with oats/fruit is fine, as long as you add the fruits at the end and don’t let the fruit sit overnight, which will harm the probiotics. The idea here is that you don’t want to eat the kefir after a greasy breakfast which will block the absorption of kefir in the gut – oatmeal isn’t a problem. Tea and coffee also ok. Great to hear that you’re doing well – keep us posted!x

  9. Hi Shann, I’m a nubie to kefir, am excited about its benefits and love it’s sparkly flavour! A question on the noodles – I googled them and found a huge variation in price – are the less expensive ones ok?
    Min

  10. Mmmm – looks tasty! Excited to give this a go. Quick question to clarify: I get that the fruit has to go in at the very last minute – makes sense 🙂 – but what if I’m using additional bits like the coconut oil, nut butters, cacao, vanilla etc. listed in your suggestions, maybe other nuts and seeds … ? Would those also go in in the morning before blending – or is it better to add them at night, with the oats and the chia? Or does it not matter so much?

    Thank you!

    1. Hi Katerina – Anything with lectins that could benefit from being broken down, like nuts and seeds, can go in the night before. Everything else should be added in the morning. Good luck and let us know how you get on! Best, Shann

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